Copyright © 2018-2020 Spectrum Monkey |  monkey@spectrummonkey.com



 BLOG ZONE
¡EMPECEMOS!
 02 AUG 2018 | WELCOME | POST #1
 1 MIN | by Spectrum Monkey

Welcome to the Spectrum Monkey Blog Zone. Let's begin our journey!

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PROGRESS UPDATE
 06 AUG 2018 | SITE UPDATE | POST #2
 2 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

A short progress report of site development to date.

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LEARN YOUR ABCs
 08 AUG 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #3
 20 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Pronunciation - Let's not run before we can "talk".

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ACCENTS AND ACCENTS
 14 AUG 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #4
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Following on from our ABCs. Why accents are important, both kinds!

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ADJECTIVES QUIZ
 17 AUG 2018 | LEARNING TOOL | POST #5
 3 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

How to get the most from the Adjectives Quiz.

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DECONSTRUCTING 10
SPANISH PHRASES

 23 AUG 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #6
 15 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Let's looks at 10 simple Spanish phrases and really understand their sentence construction.

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NUMBERS, TIMES, DATES & GENDER AGREEMENT
 28 AUG 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #7
 20 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Exploring different types of numbers in Spanish and how they are affected by gender agreement.

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DAYS AND MONTHS CONTINUED
 30 AUG 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #8
 20 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Continuing on from the previous post. Let's expand our vocabulary beyond just numbers.

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ASKING QUESTIONS
 05 SEP 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #9
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Examining how questions are formed in Spanish, using statement phrases and question words.

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SALUTATIONS
 14 SEP 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #10
 15 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Exploring common ways to say Hello and Goodbye in various situation.

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ADVERBS
 24 SEP 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #11
 7 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Introducing more concepts of Spanish grammar.

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THE RAIN IN SPAIN STAYS MAINLY ON THE PLANE
 27 SEP 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #12
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

¡El tiempo! - Looking at different ways to describe the weather.

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5 SPANISH WORDS THAT DON'T EXIST IN ENGLISH
 3 OCT 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #13
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Let’s look at five different words that have no direct English translation and see what we can learn.

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NOUNS
 10 OCT 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #14
 12 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

A beginner's guide to nouns, and why we have gender agreement.

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ARTICLES
 15 OCT 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #15
 8 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Following our recent lesson on Nouns. Let's explore the articles that accompany them.

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ANTONYMS: BECAUSE OPPOSITES ATTRACT!
 17 OCT 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #16
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Learning words with their opposites in pairs.

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AN INTRODUCTION TO VERBS
 30 OCT 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #17
 12 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Scratching the surface of "doing" words.

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VERB PARADIGMS AND PATTERNS


 08 NOV 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #18
 20 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Continuing to explore verb forms. Learning by patterns.

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In the last blog entry we had a short introduction to verbs. Today we will continue to expand our understanding of forming verbs, focussing on the paradigms (patterns) of Spanish verbs.

The Paradigm of Subjects
Grammatically, the subject of a sentence is the person, place or thing that is doing or being something. Examples of subjects are: Oneself (I), you, he, she, us, them, a car, a woman, the thing, some people and so on…

In Spanish we split subjects into two categories: point of view and plurality. There are three points of view, which can be either singular or plural. Therefore giving us six possible subject types:

Singular Plural
1st Person I we
2nd Person you you all
3rd Person he/she/it/you(formal) they

It is exactly this paradigm or pattern of subjects that dictate how we will conjugate our verbs in any given tense.

Explaining 1st, 2nd and 3rd persons
In grammar (both English and Spanish), we divide the point of view into three different voices. These are known as first person, second person and third person depending on the subject.

The first person describes me in the singular and us in the plural. We are almost certainly talking in the first person whenever we use pronouns such as: I, me, myself, mine, we, us and ourselves.

The second person describes when things happen to you, or you all in the plural. Pronouns such as you, yours, yourself and yourselves indicate we are referring to the second person.

The third person describes a subject that isn’t you or I. It can refer to other people or things. Pronouns such as he, she, his, her, it, its, them and their all refer to the third person.

In Spanish, the third person adds an extra layer of complexity to proceedings. In addition to referring to other people and things, the third person is also used to refer to you, but formally. That is to say: if you are addressing someone formally (perhaps an elderly person or your boss) you might use the “usted” form of you instead of “tú”. In this case it falls into the third person category. We will see more examples of this shortly.

Important: Some parts of the Spanish speaking world, including much of the Americas and indeed the Spanish Canary Islands, DO NOT use the second person plural form. The you all (vosotros) form.

Instead they ALWAYS use the formal third person plural form (the ustedes form), even when addressing good friends.

We will however, continue to learn all forms. Even if you live in or will be using Spanish in a part of the world where the second person plural form isn’t used. It’s still worth learning all forms. Particularly as you will still encounter written Spanish from potentially anywhere in the Spanish speaking world.

We believe learning the paradigms of Spanish verbs in a complete group of six, is far easier than trying to learn the same pattern with gaps, or an unbalanced group of three and two; And as your Spanish becomes more proficient, having gaps in your knowledge could become a hindrance.


Conjugating verbs using the six form paradigm
When we learn new Spanish verbs, we must learn all six forms per tense using the same paradigm that describes the subjects. Here is an example of the verb cambiar (to change) in the present tense:

cambiar (to change) | present tense
Singular Plural
1st Person cambio (I change) cambiamos (we change)
2nd Person cambias (you change) cambiáis (you all change)
3rd Person cambia (he/she/it changes) cambian (they change)

In the above example, we have added the English translations just for now, so we can easily compare the meaning with the six different conjugations. Now let’s see the same verb, but in the future tense.

cambiar (to change) | future tense
Singular Plural
1st Person cambiaré (I will change) cambiaremos (we will change)
2nd Person cambiarás (you will change) cambiaréis (you all will change)
3rd Person cambiará (he/she/it will change) cambiarán (they will change)

As we can see from the two tense examples above, all six conjugations in each tense are completely different. So covering just these two tenses we must learn 12 different forms. When we consider there are more than 20 unique tenses in the Spanish language, it means we must ultimately learn well over 100 forms per verb!

This is radically different to English, where typically there are no more than 5 forms per verb, which will cover all tenses and all subjects.

Do not panic though. As we will begin to discover, there are patterns within the paradigms, that once learnt mean we can start to predict conjugation forms. We will look at these patterns next.

Patterns within Regular Verbs
In our previous blog post: An Introduction to Verbs, we learnt that we can categorise verbs into three kinds: verbs that end in –ar, -er and –ir.

We also learnt that if we remove those endings, we are left with the stem. By following a few simple rules we can create the past participle and gerund by simply adding endings to the stem. This works providing we are dealing with regular verbs.

Regular Spanish infinitive Past particles Gerund
hablar (to speak) hablado (spoken) hablando (speaking)
comer (to eat) comido (eaten) comiendo (eating)
vivir (to live) vivido (lived) viviendo (living)

To explain this further. In English, we can do similar. If the verb is regular, we can construct the past participle and gerund by taking the infinitive and adding –ed and –ing respectively. Here are some examples:

Regular English infinitive Past particles Gerund
to look looked looking
to work worked working
to call called calling

Of course, in English there are irregular verbs too. These are called so, because they do not follow these simple paradigms of appending -ed and -ing. Examples are verbs like: to go, to do and to sing. Their past participles are not: “goed”, “doed” and “singed”. They are of course “gone”, “done” and “sung”. So, because they do not end in -ed they are consider irregular.

In Spanish, we have plenty of irregular verbs too, in varying degrees of irregularity. As we mentioned before, there are no rules for these irregularities, we must simply learn these differences as vocabulary. But even then, there are patterns within the irregularities that can help us.

Today though, we are only going to look further at regular Spanish verbs, so we can continue to learn the patterns within the paradigms.

Basic verb tenses
Before we start to look at the conjugations. Let’s quickly discuss some of the verb tenses we are going to see today.

In English, we generally only notice 3 verb tenses. The present tense, the past tense and the future tense. That is not say there aren’t other tenses, but unless you happen to be an English teacher or have recently studied English grammar, the other tenses may not be something you are aware of.

Other tenses in English can reflect mood as well as time. But because they are expressed, in general, by auxiliary modal verbs like “should” or “would” and do not affect verb conjugation, they can go largely unnoticed. Even the future tense itself is expressed by the auxiliary modal verb “will”.

In complete contrast, we have many more verb tenses in Spanish. Some too are expressed by auxiliary verbs, but others are completely new conjugations which must be learnt.

Today we are going to look at 3 tenses. The present indicative tense, the preterite tense which is one of the past tenses (and there are several), and the future indicative tense.

We will of course, introduce more tenses over time, but for today we will look at these three and learn how we can form them from patterns found within regular verbs.

Conjugating regular –ar verbs
Below we will see the verb hablar (to speak), conjugated into the present indicative tense, the preterite tense and the future indicative tense. Highlighted are the verb endings.

This means: providing a verb is regular and ends in –ar, it may formed by using the same endings appended to the stem.

Remember: The stem is the infinitive form minus the –ar.

hablar (to speak) | present indicative tense
Singular Plural
1st Person hablo hablamos
2nd Person hablas habláis
3rd Person habla hablan

hablar (to speak) | preterite tense (past)
Singular Plural
1st Person hablé hablamos
2nd Person hablaste hablasteis
3rd Person habló hablaron

hablar (to speak) | future indicative tense
Singular Plural
1st Person hablaré hablaremos
2nd Person hablarás hablaréis
3rd Person hablará hablarán

Remember: We can take these highlighted endings, and apply them to any stem of a regular -ar verb.

Other regular -ar verbs include: pasar (to pass), dejar (to leave), llamar (to call), llevar (to carry), tomar (to take), mirar (to look at, to watch), terminar (to finish, to end), necesitar (to need), cambiar (to change), esperar (to wait, to hope)
Let’s see some uses of our conjugated verb hablar (to speak) in some very basic sentence constructions:

Spanish Meaning Tense
Hablan español They speak Spanish present
¿Habló ella contigo? Did she speak with you? preterite (past)
¿Hablaste español hoy? Did you speak Spanish today? preterite (past)
Hablaré contigo más tarde I will speak to you later future

Conjugating regular –er verbs
Next we will see the verb comer (to eat), conjugated into the present indicative tense, the preterite tense and the future indicative tense. Again, the verb ending patterns are highlighted.

comer (to eat) | present indicative tense
Singular Plural
1st Person como comemos
2nd Person comes coméis
3rd Person come comen

comer (to eat) | preterite tense (past)
Singular Plural
1st Person comí comimos
2nd Person comiste comisteis
3rd Person com comieron

comer (to eat) | future indicative tense
Singular Plural
1st Person comeré comeremos
2nd Person comerás comeréis
3rd Person comerá comerán

Remember: We can take these highlighted endings, and apply them to any stem of a regular -er verb.

Other regular -er verbs include: correr (to run), aprender (to learn), vender (to sell), meter (to put in), depender (to depend), leer (to read), romper (to break), beber (to drink), toser (to cough), deber (to owe, should)
Now let’s see some uses of our conjugated verb comer (to eat) in some very basic sentence constructions:

Spanish Meaning Tense
Comemos bien We eat well present
Comiste el último You ate the last one preterite (past)
Comerán juntos They will eat together future

Conjugating regular –ir verbs
Below we will see the verb vivir (to live), conjugated into the present indicative tense, the preterite tense and the future indicative tense. Highlighted are the verb endings.

vivir (to live) | present indicative tense
Singular Plural
1st Person vivo vivimos
2nd Person vives vivís
3rd Person vive viven

vivir (to live) | preterite tense (past)
Singular Plural
1st Person viví vivimos
2nd Person viviste vivisteis
3rd Person viv vivieron

vivir (to live) | future indicative tense
Singular Plural
1st Person viviré viviremos
2nd Person vivirás viviréis
3rd Person vivirá vivirán

Remember: We can take these highlighted endings, and apply them to any stem of a regular -ir verb.

Other regular -ir verbs include: abrir (to open), partir (to divide), imprimir (to print), subir (to go up), prohibir (to prohibit), omitir (to omit), consumir (to consume), recibir (to receive)
Finally, let’s see some uses of our conjugated verb vivir (to live) in some more basic sentence constructions:

Spanish Meaning Tense
Vivo aquí I live here present
¿Usted vivió allí? Did you (formal) live there? preterite (past)
Viviremos allí un día We will live there one day future

Remember: When we address someone formally, we must use the third person conjugation and the “usted” version of you instead of “tú”.

Conclusion | En conclusión
As should be becoming apparent by now, Spanish verbs are massively complicated in comparison to English. Today we’ve introduced three basic tenses that are at least comparable to English; yet their conjugations are far more involved.

Hopefully though, by identifying patterns within regular verbs we can start to learn the conjugated forms through familiarity.

Now that we are used to seeing the paradigm of six subjects, we will present all our verb tenses using this format. Where ever possible we will learn the patterns within the paradigm, which ultimately is the key to learning Spanish verbs efficiently.

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DIMINUTIVES
 13 NOV 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #19
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Words that are not only reserved for small cute things.

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AY, HAY, AHÍ OR ALLÍ?
 19 NOV 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #20
 4 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Demystifying some common words that are phonetically similar.

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MORE PAST TENSES AND AUXILIARY VERBS
 29 NOV 2018 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #21
 15 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Learning more verb tenses, and how to use the auxiliary verb haber.

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MOODS AND MORE SIMPLE FORM VERB TENSES
 10 DEC 2018 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #22
 15 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Expressing commands, ideas, feelings and opinions with the subjunctive and imperative tenses.

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¡FELIZ NAVIDAD A TODOS!
 17 DEC 2018 | BEGINNER | POST #23
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Seasons greetings! A festive look at some Spanish Christmas phrases.

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YET MORE SIMPLE FORM VERB TENSES
 30 DEC 2018 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #24
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Finishing our look at simple form verb tenses: The conditional and imperfect subjunctive.

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IRREGULAR VERBS
 10 JAN 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #25
 15 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Let's talk about verbs that don't follow the rules.

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SPANISH OMELETTE | TORTILLA DE PATATAS
 15 JAN 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #26
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Indulging our inner foodie with this Spanish classic.

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5 CANARIAN WORDS
 19 JAN 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #27
 3 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Five interesting yet completely different Spanish words that originate from the Canary Islands.

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AN INTRODUCTION TO PRONOUNS
 22 JAN 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #28
 15 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Taking our first look at one of the most fiddly aspects of Spanish grammar.

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VERB CONJUGATION TOOL
 24 JAN 2019 | LEARNING TOOL | POST #29
 1 MIN | by Spectrum Monkey

Introducing the Spectrum Monkey verb conjugation tool.

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¿SER O ESTAR?
 31 JAN 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #30
 12 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

“To be, or not to be, what is the difference?”

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NI
 08 FEB 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #31
 3 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Exploring a tiny little word that deserves a proper explanation.

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EL DÍA DE SAN VALENTÍN
 12 FEB 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #32
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Dissecting six “romantic” phrases in time for St. Valentine’s Day.

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RELATIVE PRONOUNS
 19 FEB 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #33
 15 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Continuing our look at fiddly Spanish grammar with relative pronouns.

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CONJUNCTIONS
 26 FEB 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #34
 8 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

A brief look at linking words with some interesting alternative forms.

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SPANISH FITNESS AND EXERCISE CLASSES
 07 MAR 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #35
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

How keeping fit in groups can improve our Spanish.

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OBJECT PRONOUNS
 14 MAR 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #36
 20 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Furthering our look at Spanish pronouns with direct and indirect object pronouns.

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REFLEXIVE VERBS
 20 MAR 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #37
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Actions where we act upon ourselves

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¿POR O PARA?
 26 MAR 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #38
 15 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Explaining two easily confused prepositions.

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YA
 30 MAR 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #39
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

A word every newcomer should know "already".

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O SEA
 03 APR 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #40
 2 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

An expression not only reserved for young people.

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THE FUTURE SUBJUNCTIVE TENSE
 05 APR 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #41
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Ideas for the future that have been left in the past.

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THE PERSONAL “A”
 09 APR 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #42
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Explaining a very Spanish preposition.

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COMPOUND VERB TENSES
 18 APR 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #43
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Describing actions completed and on-going.

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THE PASSIVE VOICE
 26 APR 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #44
 8 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Focusing on the action rather than the subject.

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NEGATIVES
 29 APR 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #45
 7 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Learning how to form negative sentences.

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SPANISH CAFÉ CULTURE
 09 MAY 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #46
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Beyond just ordering a coffee.

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¿ESTE O ESTO?
 12 MAY 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #47
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Is it really this one?

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“ACABAR DE...”
 21 MAY 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #48
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

How to express having just done something.

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FILLER WORDS | MULETILLAS
 25 MAY 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #49
 9 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Muletillas: words that offer us a little support through conversations.

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“AL + INFINITIVE” CONSTRUCTIONS
 05 JUN 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #50
 4 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

An alternative way to describe when things are occurring.

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HABER
 13 JUN 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #51
 7 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Expressing existence.

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FALSE FRIENDS
 23 JUN 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #52
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Words that aren't what they seem.

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5 TIPS THAT WILL IMPROVE YOUR SPANISH
 01 JUL 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #53
 9 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Some simple tips that will help us remain on the right path.

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ADJECTIVES: PART 1
 10 JUL 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #54
 12 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Taking a closer look at describing words.

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ADJECTIVES: PART 2
 18 JUL 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #55
 17 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Continuing our look at describing words.

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DO YOU LIKE IT OR DOES IT PLEASE YOU?
 23 JUL 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #56
 8 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Demystifying so-called back to front verbs.

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SORRY / FORGIVE ME / EXCUSE ME
 26 JUL 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #57
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Looking at different ways to apologise in Spanish.

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WHEN TO USE ARTICLES
 10 AUG 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #58
 8 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Mastering when to include or omit articles in Spanish.

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“POR LO…” EXPRESSIONS
 11 AUG 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #59
 8 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Dissecting six useful constructions that use por and lo.

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5 IDIOMATIC EXPRESSIONS USING DAR
 22 AUG 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #60
 7 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Continuing our look at some more idiomatic expressions.

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WHAT
 26 AUG 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #61
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Distinguishing between the different ways to express what in Spanish.

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WHEN TO USE THE PERFECT TENSE
 03 SEP 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #62
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Describing recently completed actions.

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SWEARING IN SPANISH
 07 SEP 2019 | BEGINNER | NSFW | POST #63
 7 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

How to curse using a few choice Spanish words.

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COGNATES
 14 SEP 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #64
 8 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Words that are the same or similar in both English and Spanish.

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THE PRESENT PROGRESSIVE TENSE
 25 SEP 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #65
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Describing on-going actions that are happening right now.

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VERBS OF CHANGE
 07 OCT 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #66
 12 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Looking at different ways to express becoming.

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5 WAYS TO USE “ACUERDO”
 15 OCT 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #67
 10 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Exploring different ways to use an essential word based around agreement.

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DECONSTRUCTING 5
SPANISH PROVERBS

 18 OCT 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #68
 7 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Comparing a few wise words across both English and Spanish.

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PORQUE, POR QUÉ, PORQUÉ O POR QUE
 25 OCT 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #69
 6 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Four similar constructions with somewhat different meanings.

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WHEN SÍ DOESN'T MEAN YES
 05 NOV 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #70
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Explaining a meaning of sí that can go unnoticed by “itself”

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5 DIFFERENT WAYS TO EXPRESS “LET'S”
 13 NOV 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #71
 6 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Allowing ourselves and making suggestions.

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“A PARTIR DE”
 22 NOV 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #72
 4 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Beginning to expand our knowledge of idiomatic phrases.

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“ECHAR DE MENOS”
 30 NOV 2019 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #73
 4 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

How to say "I miss you" in Spanish.

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“MUY, PERO QUE MUY”
 11 DEC 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #74
 3 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Emphasising and intensifying a statement.

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“PERO BUENO”
 18 DEC 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #75
 2 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Expressing incredulity, surprise and acceptance.

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PREPOSITIONS
 26 DEC 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #76
 20 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

How people or things relate to others.

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ARROBA
 29 DEC 2019 | BEGINNER | POST #77
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Using @ (the at symbol).

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QUEDAR
 09 JAN 2020 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #78
 8 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Expanding our knowledge of this essential Spanish verb.

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TENER QUE / HABER DE
 13 JAN 2020 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #79
 3 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Alternative ways of expressing obligation or need.

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SPANISH IDIOMS AND PROVERBS
 25 JAN 2020 | BEGINNER | POST #80
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Learning a few catchy phrases that are almost identical across both English and Spanish.

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“ME DA” + NOUN VS
“ME PONE” + ADJECTIVE

 30 JAN 2020 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #81
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Two different constructions that help us describe how we feel.

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3 SPANISH NOUNS WITH AMBIGUOUS GENDER
 12 FEB 2020 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #82
 5 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Nouns that can be both male and female.

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5 SIMPLE PHRASES STARTING WITH "EN..."
 19 FEB 2020 | INTERMEDIATE | POST #83
 7 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Expanding our knowledge with these useful phrases.

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¿TRANQUILO O TRANQUILA?"
 20 FEB 2020 | BEGINNER | POST #84
 3 MINS | by Spectrum Monkey

Two commonly used interjections that offer reassurance.

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